Figtree Fingers

Figtree Fingers -Suzannah Babicci - Acrylic/wool yarn, reflective tape (polyester, glass beads, phenolic resin, urethane adhesive) steel wire, electrical tape, EL wire, decorative threads (rayon, metallic) waxed cotton thread, twine 

Suzannah Babicci

Figtree Fingers

Acrylic/wool yarn, reflective tape (polyester, glass beads, phenolic resin, urethane adhesive) steel wire, electrical tape, EL wire, decorative threads (rayon, metallic) waxed cotton thread, twine

Various Dimensions

$350 per piece

Photography: Andrew Rankin Photography

About the Work

Figtree Fingers are whimsical extensions to existing dangling roots from a large Fig tree. This work emphasises their function to reach the ground, to create additional support and find nutrients. A key feature of these sculptures are the materials for the structures: woven threads on a frame with fine reflective string. The reflective string remains hidden in the network of threads until a brilliant photo-flash capture (i.e. phone camera with flash) - an action drawing out ghostly bright evidence of the structures that would be intact if the tree had been allowed it’s natural growth. Human interference, however, has caused the roots to be severed, and this work draws on 'tongue-in-cheek' references to the hand that would cut and impede, or, possibly heal.

The sculptures also feature an outline with Electroluminescent wire (EL wire) for evening illumination, highlighting the fingers pointing downwards to the earth, calling attention to gravity and to the source of materials for sustenance. These sculptures draw attention to society's impact on the environment around us and emphasize the importance for sustainable action.

About the Artist

Babicci's artistic practice is multidisciplinary, including video, performance, sculpture, and ceramics. Completing a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Honours) at the Sydney College of the Arts (University of Sydney) in 2013, Babicci's research and studio work has concerned human interaction with the natural environment and society's shifting role in the Anthropocene. These works delve into the unseen connections found throughout the natural world, finding synergy in the individual and human collective consciousness. Babicci approaches her work with a keen interest in using materials as a visual language to explore contemporary environmental issues and the world we find around us.