Overgrown and Unsightly Properties

What constitutes an overgrown property?

Properties, which in the opinion of an authorised Council Officer, contain grass, weeds, plants or other vegetation to such an extent as to seriously affect the visual amenity of the surrounding area, or is likely to attract or harbour reptiles or vermin. The Overgrown and Unsightly Properties Information Sheet (PDF, 585.0 KB) has more information.

What constitutes an unsightly property?

Properties, which in the opinion of an authorised Council Officer, have an accumulation of objects or materials that seriously affect the visual amenity or are likely to attract or harbour reptiles or vermin. This could include untidy accumulations of building materials, plant matter, other materials, objects or things. The Overgrown and Unsightly Properties Information Sheet (PDF, 585.0 KB) has more information.

What do I do if I have a concern about a neighbour's property?

In the first instance, talk to the property owner and express your concerns. If there is no resolution, contact Council to request an inspection. More information about Council’s investigation processes can be found on the Investigations Process page.

What action does Council take?

An inspection is carried out to determine if there is a breach under Local Law 3 Community and Environmental Management 2011. Council may take action such as issuing a notice to the property owner to address the problem within a certain timeframe.

What happens if a person does not comply?

Should the owner not undertake clearance of the land within the specified period, Council's contractor will enter the property and carry out the required works.

If Council contractors are required to enter and clear land after the expiration of notices, an administration cost and the cost of carrying out the clearing of the land will be placed as a charge against the owner of the land.